Forms, Forms, and More Forms
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Craig Swapp and Associates Free Consultation
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Forms, Forms, and More Forms

If you have already applied for Social Security disability benefits, then you are familiar with the seeming piles of forms you are required to complete. And sadly, many people complete these forms on their own, without the assistance of a representative, and ultimately seal their own fate of a denial, simply because they choose the wrong words. So, how does this happen, and what can be done to maximize the effectiveness of all of this paperwork? At Craig Swapp & Associates, we complete the forms with you, helping to find the wording that accurately describes your impairments and yet coordinates with the underlying regulations that determine disability. For example, I once talked to a man who had written on a form that he took his dog out for a walk every day. An examiner might review this and determine that the man has the ability to walk long distances. After talking more to this client, however, I found out that he would take his dog outside in the backyard, sit on the back porch, and watch while his dog ran on a long leash. The man had severe back problems and could not even walk around the block. Another example I have seen several times is a grandparent who babysits a grandchild. This gives the examiner the notion that the grandparent could perform work as a daycare provider or similar other light work. In reality, that grandparent might be babysitting an 8-year-old, who ultimately takes care of herself and even helps with some chores around the house.
Some tips: Remember that Social Security is trying to determine if you have the ability to work a full-time job. Everything you write down is going to be applied to a work setting to determine if you can work. So, if you say you spend time every day on the computer checking emails, a decision-maker at Social Security might say you can work a desk job. If you say you go golfing regularly, they might assume you can be on your feet all day every day. But if you truly cannot work, you need to clarify your comments. If you check email twice a day, but are lying in bed and can only be on the computer for 10 minutes at a time – you have to write that down, too. If you golf once every other month, but only get through 5 holes, use a cart, and hurt badly afterwards, you need to include that in your comments. You need to be honest about what you do, but be sure to explain how what you can do could not transfer to full-time employment.
Craig Swapp & Associates
9980 S 300 W Suite 400, Sandy, UT 84070
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